Quotations from Pride and Prejudice concerning Elizabeth's feelings for Mr. Darcy,
compiled, with additional italics and comments, by Line.

click here for Elizabeth's feelings about Wickham and Colonel Fitzwilliam



How Elizabeth feels about Darcy is a recurring topic of discussion at the Pemberley P&P board, and I finally decided to hunt for all the evidence I could find in the novel. Listing it all was a lot harder than listing the evidence of her feelings about Wickham, since obviously there's a lot more of it! Also, several times you have to read through a lengthy conversation to reach a conclusion about her feelings at that particular point, so I had to decide how to do this without quoting the entire book! Some of their best-known long conversations I have just mentioned in passing instead of quoting them, since I figured that all Pemberleans know them pretty much by heart and will look them up as needed..


The first number at the beginning of each quotation is the chapter, and the one in brackets is the (more or less accurate) paragraph number according to the pop-up text at the RoP. All highlighting, most of the italics, as well as changes and comments in square brackets [ ] are mine. I've done two versions: the short "highlights" version, and the long, every-detail-I-could-find version. Of course, I've come to a pretty firm conclusion about what Elizabeth's feelings for Darcy are, but you must each decide for yourselves!






How Elizabeth Feels About Darcy (short version)




Ch.3 (5): Omniscient narrator (ON): [Bingley’s] friend Mr. Darcy soon drew the attention of the room by his fine, tall person, handsome features, noble mien, and the report, which was in general circulation within five minutes after his entrance, of his having ten thousand a year. The gentlemen pronounced him to be a fine figure of a man, the ladies declared he was much handsomer than Mr. Bingley, and he was looked at with great admiration for about half the evening, till his manners gave a disgust which turned the tide of his popularity; for he was discovered to be proud, to be above his company, and above being pleased; and not all his large estate in Derbyshire could then save him from having a most forbidding, disagreeable countenance, and being unworthy to be compared with his friend. [Presumably Elizabeth agrees in a general way with both opinions.]

3 (14) ON: Mr. Darcy walked off [after making his “not handsome enough” remark]; and Elizabeth remained with no very cordial feelings towards him. She told the story, however, with great spirit among her friends; for she had a lively, playful disposition, which delighted in any thing ridiculous.

6 (12) ON: Occupied in observing Mr. Bingley's attentions to her sister, Elizabeth was far from suspecting that she was herself becoming an object of some interest in the eyes of his friend…Of this she was perfectly unaware; -- to her he was only the man who made himself agreeable nowhere, and who had not thought her handsome enough to dance with.

12 (5) ON: On Sunday, after morning service, the separation [from the Netherfielders], so agreeable to almost all, took place…Elizabeth took leave of the whole party in the liveliest spirits.

16 (33) Elizabeth, after hearing Wickham’s story: "I had not thought Mr. Darcy so bad as this -- though I have never liked him, I had not thought so very ill of him. -- I had supposed him to be despising his fellow-creatures in general, but did not suspect him of descending to such malicious revenge, such injustice, such inhumanity as this!" [but now she does]

18 (3) ON, about Elizabeth’s feelings at the Netherfield ball: Attention, forbearance, patience with Darcy, was injury to Wickham.

18 (66) ON: That [Bingley’s] two sisters and Mr. Darcy, however, should have such an opportunity of ridiculing her relations [at the Netherfield ball], was bad enough, and [Elizabeth] could not determine whether the silent contempt of the gentleman, or the insolent smiles of the ladies, were more intolerable.

26 (7) Elizabeth, speaking of her slim chances of being able to marry Mr. Wickham: “Oh! that abominable Mr. Darcy!”

30 (6) ON: Elizabeth had heard soon after her arrival [in Hunsford] that Mr. Darcy was expected there in the course of a few weeks, and though there were not many of her acquaintance whom she did not prefer, his coming would furnish one comparatively new to look at in their Rosings parties, and she might be amused in seeing how hopeless Miss Bingley's designs on him were.

31 (12-29) – The “Piano Conversation” at Rosings

34 (3-30) – Darcy’s First Proposal

36 (7) ON: [After reading Darcy’s letter, Elizabeth] grew absolutely ashamed of herself. Of neither Darcy nor Wickham could she think without feeling that she had been blind, partial, prejudiced, absurd.

37 (16) ON: Mr. Darcy's letter [Elizabeth] was in a fair way of soon knowing by heart. She studied every sentence; and her feelings towards its writer were at times widely different. When she remembered the style of his address, she was still full of indignation; but when she considered how unjustly she had condemned and upbraided him, her anger was turned against herself; and his disappointed feelings became the object of compassion. His attachment excited gratitude, his general character respect; but she could not approve him; nor could she for a moment repent her refusal, or feel the slightest inclination ever to see him again.

41 (10) ON: Such were the kind of lamentations resounding perpetually through Longbourn House [about (not) going to Brighton]. Elizabeth tried to be diverted by them; but all sense of pleasure was lost in shame. She felt anew the justice of Mr. Darcy's objections; and never had she before been so much disposed to pardon his interference in the views of his friend.

42 (15) ON: Elizabeth said no more -- but her mind could not acquiesce. The possibility of meeting Mr. Darcy, while viewing [Pemberley], instantly occurred. It would be dreadful! She blushed at the very idea, and thought it would be better to speak openly to her aunt than to run such a risk.

43 (3) ON: [Elizabeth] had never seen a place for which nature had done more, or where natural beauty had been so little counteracted by an awkward taste. They were all of them warm in their admiration; and at that moment she felt that to be mistress of Pemberley might be something!

43 (48) ON: There was certainly at this moment, in Elizabeth's mind, a more gentle sensation towards the original [of the portrait] than she had ever felt in the height of their acquaintance.

43 (54) ON, about Elizabeth’s feelings: And his behaviour, so strikingly altered -- what could it mean? That he should even speak to her was amazing! -- but to speak with such civility, to inquire after her family! Never in her life had she seen his manners so little dignified, never had he spoken with such gentleness as on this unexpected meeting. What a contrast did it offer to his last address in Rosings Park, when he put his letter into her hand! She knew not what to think, nor how to account for it.

44 (10) ON: It was not often that [Elizabeth] could turn her eyes on Mr. Darcy himself; but, whenever she did catch a glimpse, she saw an expression of general complaisance, and in all that he said she heard an accent so far removed from hauteur or disdain of his companions, as convinced her that the improvement of manners which she had yesterday witnessed, however temporary its existence might prove, had at least outlived one day.

44 (16) ON: As for Elizabeth, her thoughts were at Pemberley this evening more than the last; and the evening, though as it passed it seemed long, was not long enough to determine her feelings towards one in that mansion; and she lay awake two whole hours endeavouring to make them out. She certainly did not hate him. No; hatred had vanished long ago, and she had almost as long been ashamed of ever feeling a dislike against him, that could be so called. The respect created by the conviction of his valuable qualities, though at first unwillingly admitted, had for some time ceased to be repugnant to her feelings; and it was now heightened into somewhat of a friendlier nature by the testimony so highly in his favour, and bringing forward his disposition in so amiable a light, which yesterday had produced…She respected, she esteemed, she was grateful to him, she felt a real interest in his welfare; and she only wanted to know how far she wished that welfare to depend upon herself, and how far it would be for the happiness of both that she should employ the power, which her fancy told her she still possessed, of bringing on the renewal of his addresses.

46 (19) ON: Darcy made no answer [after hearing the news about Lydia]. He seemed scarcely to hear her, and was walking up and down the room in earnest meditation, his brow contracted, his air gloomy. Elizabeth soon observed, and instantly understood it. Her power was sinking; everything must sink under such a proof of family weakness, such an assurance of the deepest disgrace. She could neither wonder nor condemn, but the belief of his self-conquest brought nothing consolatory to her bosom, afforded no palliation of her distress. It was, on the contrary, exactly calculated to make her understand her own wishes; and never had she so honestly felt that she could have loved him, as now, when all love must be vain.

46 (24) ON: If gratitude and esteem are good foundations of affection, Elizabeth's change of sentiment will be neither improbable nor faulty…Be that as it may, she saw [Darcy] go with regret; and in this early example of what Lydia's infamy must produce, found additional anguish as she reflected on that wretched business.

50 (13) [Really in love at last, IMO! - Line] ON: The wish of procuring her regard, which [Elizabeth] had assured herself of [Darcy’s] feeling in Derbyshire, could not in rational expectation survive such a blow as this. She was humbled, she was grieved; she repented, though she hardly knew of what. She became jealous of his esteem, when she could no longer hope to be benefited by it. She wanted to hear of him, when there seemed the least chance of gaining intelligence. She was convinced that she could have been happy with him, when it was no longer likely they should meet.

50 (14) ON: What a triumph for [Darcy], as [Elizabeth] often thought, could he know that the proposals which she had proudly spurned only four months ago, would now have been gladly and gratefully received!

50 (15) ON: [Elizabeth] began now to comprehend that [Darcy] was exactly the man who, in disposition and talents, would most suit her. His understanding and temper, though unlike her own, would have answered all her wishes.

53 (35) ON: [Darcy] was the person to whom the whole family were indebted for the first of benefits, and whom [Elizabeth] regarded herself with an interest, if not quite so tender, at least as reasonable and just as what Jane felt for Bingley.


How Elizabeth Feels About Darcy [long version]

Ch.3 (5) ON: [Bingley’s] friend Mr. Darcy soon drew the attention of the room by his fine, tall person, handsome features, noble mien, and the report, which was in general circulation within five minutes after his entrance, of his having ten thousand a year. The gentlemen pronounced him to be a fine figure of a man, the ladies declared he was much handsomer than Mr. Bingley, and he was looked at with great admiration for about half the evening, till his manners gave a disgust which turned the tide of his popularity; for he was discovered to be proud, to be above his company, and above being pleased; and not all his large estate in Derbyshire could then save him from having a most forbidding, disagreeable countenance, and being unworthy to be compared with his friend.

3 (6) ON: [Darcy’s] character was decided. He was the proudest, most disagreeable man in the world, and every body hoped that he would never come there again.

3 (14) ON: Mr. Darcy walked off [after making his “not handsome enough” remark]; and Elizabeth remained with no very cordial feelings towards him. She told the story, however, with great spirit among her friends; for she had a lively, playful disposition, which delighted in any thing ridiculous.

5 (18) "His pride," said Miss [Charlotte] Lucas, "does not offend me so much as pride often does, because there is an excuse for it. One cannot wonder that so very fine a young man, with family, fortune, everything in his favour, should think highly of himself. If I may so express it, he has a right to be proud."

5 (19) "That is very true," replied Elizabeth, "and I could easily forgive his pride, if he had not mortified mine."

6 (12) ON: Occupied in observing Mr. Bingley's attentions to her sister, Elizabeth was far from suspecting that she was herself becoming an object of some interest in the eyes of his friend…Of this she was perfectly unaware; -- to her he was only the man who made himself agreeable nowhere, and who had not thought her handsome enough to dance with.

6 (13) ON: [Darcy] began to wish to know more of her, and as a step towards conversing with her himself, attended to her conversation with others. His doing so drew her notice. It was at Sir William Lucas's, where a large party were assembled.

6 (14) "What does Mr. Darcy mean," said [Elizabeth] to Charlotte, "by listening to my conversation with Colonel Forster?"

6 (15) Charlotte: "That is a question which Mr. Darcy only can answer."

6 (16)  Elizabeth: "But if he does it any more I shall certainly let him know that I see what he is about. He has a very satirical eye, and if I do not begin by being impertinent myself, I shall soon grow afraid of him."

6 (38) Sir William Lucas: "My dear Miss Eliza, why are not you dancing? -- Mr. Darcy, you must allow me to present this young lady to you as a very desirable partner. You cannot refuse to dance, I am sure, when so much beauty is before you." And, taking her hand, he would have given it to Mr. Darcy, who, though extremely surprised, was not unwilling to receive it, when she instantly drew back, and said with some discomposure to Sir William --

6 (39) Elizabeth: "Indeed, sir, I have not the least intention of dancing. I entreat you not to suppose that I moved this way in order to beg for a partner."

8 (21) ON: [Jane] was still very poorly, and Elizabeth would not quit her at all, till late in the evening, when she had the comfort of seeing her asleep, and when it appeared to her rather right than pleasant that she should go down stairs herself.

8 (39) ON: Elizabeth was so much caught by what passed as to leave her very little attention for her book.

8 (46-54) – The “Accomplished Woman” Conversation

9 (24) "Indeed, Mama, you are mistaken," said Elizabeth, blushing for her mother. "You quite mistook Mr. Darcy. He only meant that there were not such a variety of people to be met with in the country as in town, which you must acknowledge to be true."

9 (32) "And so ended [Jane’s admirer’s] affection," said Elizabeth impatiently. "There has been many a one, I fancy, overcome in the same way. I wonder who first discovered the efficacy of poetry in driving away love!"

9 (33)  "I have been used to consider poetry as the food of love," said Darcy.

9 (34) Elizabeth: "Of a fine, stout, healthy love it may. Everything nourishes what is strong already. But if it be only a slight, thin sort of inclination, I am convinced that one good sonnet will starve it entirely away."

(35) ON: Darcy only smiled; and the general pause which ensued made Elizabeth tremble lest her mother should be exposing herself again. She longed to speak, but could think of nothing to say.

10 (2) ON: Elizabeth took up some needlework, and was sufficiently amused in attending to what passed between Darcy and his companion [Caroline Bingley]. The perpetual commendations of the lady, either on his handwriting, or on the evenness of his lines, or on the length of his letter, with the perfect unconcern with which her praises were received, formed a curious dialogue, and was exactly in unison with [Elizabeth’s] opinion of each.

10 (20-39) – The “Doing Things Quickly” and “Yielding to the Persuasion of a Friend” Conversation

10 (40) ON: Mr. Darcy smiled; but Elizabeth thought she could perceive that he was rather offended, and therefore checked her laugh.

10 (51 – ON, after the “dancing a reel” conversation): Elizabeth, having rather expected to affront [Darcy], was amazed at his gallantry.

10 (61) ON: Then, taking the disengaged arm of Mr. Darcy, [Mrs. Hurst] left Elizabeth to walk by herself. The path just admitted three. Mr. Darcy felt their rudeness and immediately said, --

10 (62) "This walk is not wide enough for our party. We had better go into the avenue."

10 (63) But Elizabeth, who had not the least inclination to remain with them, laughingly answered, --

10 (64) "No, no; stay where you are. You are charmingly grouped, and appear to uncommon advantage. The picturesque would be spoilt by admitting a fourth. Good-bye."

10 (65) She then ran gaily off, rejoicing, as she rambled about, in the hope of being at home again in a day or two.

11 (12) [Caroline Bingley] asked Elizabeth whether she could at all understand [Darcy]?

11 (13) "Not at all," was her answer; "but depend upon it, he means to be severe on us, and our surest way of disappointing him will be to ask nothing about it."

11 (14) Miss Bingley, however, was incapable of disappointing Mr. Darcy in anything, and persevered, therefore, in requiring an explanation of his two motives.

11 (17-32) – The “Vanity and Pride” Conversation, especially:

11 (24) Darcy: "Yes, vanity is a weakness indeed. But pride -- where there is a real superiority of mind, pride will be always under good regulation."

11 (25) ON: Elizabeth turned away to hide a smile.

12 (1) ON: In consequence of an agreement between the sisters, Elizabeth wrote the next morning to her mother, to beg that the carriage might be sent for them in the course of the day. But Mrs. Bennet, who had calculated on her daughters remaining at Netherfield till the following Tuesday, which would exactly finish Jane's week, could not bring herself to receive them with pleasure before. Her answer, therefore, was not propitious, at least not to Elizabeth's wishes, for she was impatient to get home…Against staying longer, however, Elizabeth was positively resolved -- nor did she much expect it would be asked; and fearful, on the contrary, as being considered as intruding themselves needlessly long, she urged Jane to borrow Mr. Bingley's carriage immediately.

12 (2) ON: The communication excited many professions of concern; and enough was said of wishing them to stay at least till the following day to work on Jane [but not Elizabeth, apparently]; and till the morrow their going was deferred.

12 (5) ON: On Sunday, after morning service, the separation, so agreeable to almost all, took place…Elizabeth took leave of the whole party in the liveliest spirits.

15 (8) ON: Elizabeth, happening to see the countenance of both [Darcy and Wickham] as they looked at each other, was all astonishment at the effect of the meeting. Both changed colour; one looked white, the other red. Mr. Wickham, after a few moments, touched his hat -- a salutation which Mr. Darcy just deigned to return. What could be the meaning of it? -- It was impossible to imagine; it was impossible not to long to know.

Ch16, all spoken by Elizabeth to Wickham:

16 (13) "[I am] as much [acquainted with Mr. Darcy] as I ever wish to be," cried Elizabeth warmly. "I have spent four days in the same house with him, and I think him very disagreeable."

16 (15) "Upon my word I say no more here than I might say in any house in the neighbourhood, except Netherfield. He is not at all liked in Hertfordshire. Everybody is disgusted with his pride. You will not find him more favourably spoken of by any one."

16 (17)    "I should take [Darcy], even on my slight acquaintance, to be an ill-tempered man."

16 (28 – after hearing Wickham’s story): "This is quite shocking! – [Darcy] deserves to be publicly disgraced."

16 (33) "I had not thought Mr. Darcy so bad as this -- though I have never liked him, I had not thought so very ill of him. -- I had supposed him to be despising his fellow-creatures in general, but did not suspect him of descending to such malicious revenge, such injustice, such inhumanity as this!"

16 (34) After a few minutes reflection, however, [Elizabeth] continued -- "I do remember his boasting one day, at Netherfield, of the implacability of his resentments, of his having an unforgiving temper. His disposition must be dreadful."

18 (1) ON: But in an instant arose the dreadful suspicion [in Elizabeth’s mind] of [Wickham] being purposely omitted for Mr. Darcy's pleasure in the Bingleys' invitation to the officers [to the Netherfield ball].

18 (3) ON: As [Mr. Denny’s news] assured [Elizabeth] that Darcy was not less answerable for Wickham's absence than if her first surmise had been just, every feeling of displeasure against the former was so sharpened by immediate disappointment, that she could hardly reply with tolerable civility to the polite inquiries which he directly afterwards approached to make. Attention, forbearance, patience with Darcy, was injury to Wickham. She was resolved against any sort of conversation with him, and turned away with a degree of ill humour which she could not wholly surmount even in speaking to Mr. Bingley, whose blind partiality provoked her.

18 (7) Elizabeth to Charlotte: "Heaven forbid! That would be the greatest misfortune of all! -- To find a man agreeable whom one is determined to hate! Do not wish me such an evil."

18 (8) ON: [Elizabeth and Darcy] stood for some time without speaking a word; and she began to imagine that their silence was to last through the two dances, and at first was resolved not to break it; till suddenly, fancying that it would be the greater punishment to her partner to oblige him to talk, she made some slight observation on the dance.

18 (29-40) – The “Illustration of Your Character” Conversation, especially:

18 (35) Elizabeth: "Merely to the illustration of your character," said she, endeavouring to shake off her gravity. "I am trying to make it out."

18 (37) Elizabeth: "I do not get on at all. I hear such different accounts of you as puzzle me exceedingly."

18 (44) Elizabeth: “I see nothing in [Caroline Bingley’s “advice” about Wickham] but your own wilful ignorance and the malice of Mr. Darcy.”

18 (56) ON: With a low bow [Mr. Collins] left [Elizabeth] to attack Mr. Darcy, whose reception of his advances she eagerly watched…It vexed her to see him expose himself to such a man.

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18 (59) ON: To [Elizabeth’s] inexpressible vexation, she could perceive that the chief of [her mother’s conversation about Bingley and Jane] was overheard by Mr. Darcy, who sat opposite to them.

18 (61) Elizabeth to her mother: "For heaven's sake, madam, speak lower. -- What advantage can it be to you to offend Mr. Darcy? You will never recommend yourself to his friend by so doing."

18 (62) ON: Elizabeth blushed and blushed again with shame and vexation. She could not help frequently glancing her eye at Mr. Darcy, though every glance convinced her of what she dreaded.

18 (63) ON: [After Mary’s singing] Elizabeth was in agonies. She looked at Jane, to see how she bore it; but Jane was very composedly talking to Bingley. She looked at his two sisters, and saw them making signs of derision at each other, and at Darcy, who continued, however, impenetrably grave.

18 (66) ON: That [Bingley’s] two sisters and Mr. Darcy, however, should have such an opportunity of ridiculing her relations, was bad enough, and [Elizabeth] could not determine whether the silent contempt of the gentleman, or the insolent smiles of the ladies, were more intolerable.

18 (68) ON: [Elizabeth] was at least free from the offence of Mr. Darcy's farther notice; though often standing within a very short distance of her, quite disengaged, he never came near enough to speak. She felt it to be the probable consequence of her allusions to Mr. Wickham, and rejoiced in it.

24 (3) ON: That [Bingley] was really fond of Jane, [Elizabeth] doubted no more than she had ever done; and much as she had always been disposed to like him, she could not think without anger, hardly without contempt, on that easiness of temper, that want of proper resolution, which now made him the slave of his designing friends…whether Bingley's regard had really died away, or were suppressed by his friends' interference…her sister's situation remained the same.

24 (31) ON: Miss [Jane] Bennet was the only creature who could suppose there might be any extenuating circumstances in the case [of Wickham vs. Darcy], unknown to the society of Hertfordshire; her mild and steady candour always pleaded for allowances, and urged the possibility of mistakes -- but by everybody else [presumably including Elizabeth] Mr. Darcy was condemned as the worst of men.

25 (13) Elizabeth to Mrs. Gardiner: “[Bingley] is now in the custody of his friend, and Mr. Darcy would no more suffer him to call on Jane in such a part of London! My dear aunt, how could you think of it? Mr. Darcy may, perhaps, have heard of such a place as Gracechurch Street, but he would hardly think a month's ablution enough to cleanse him from its impurities, were he once to enter it; and, depend upon it, Mr. Bingley never stirs without him."

26 (7 – Elizabeth, speaking of her slim chances of being able to marry Mr. Wickham): “Oh! that abominable Mr. Darcy!”

28 (18) "I like [Anne de Bourgh’s] appearance," said Elizabeth, struck with other ideas. "She looks sickly and cross. Yes, she will do for [Darcy] very well. She will make him a very proper wife."

29 (12) ON: After examining the mother [Lady Catherine], in whose countenance and deportment [Elizabeth] soon found some resemblance of Mr. Darcy…

30 (6) ON: Elizabeth had heard soon after her arrival [in Hunsford] that Mr. Darcy was expected there in the course of a few weeks, and though there were not many of her acquaintance whom she did not prefer, his coming would furnish one comparatively new to look at in their Rosings parties, and she might be amused in seeing how hopeless Miss Bingley's designs on him were, by his behaviour to his cousin, for whom he was evidently destined by Lady Catherine, who talked of his coming with the greatest satisfaction, spoke of him in terms of the highest admiration, and seemed almost angry to find that he had already been frequently seen by Miss Lucas and herself.

31 (12-29) – The “Piano Conversation” at Rosings

32 (1-27) – Darcy’s accidental visit with Elizabeth alone at the Parsonage

32 (31) ON: [Mrs. Collins] had once or twice suggested to Elizabeth the possibility of [Darcy] being partial to her, but Elizabeth always laughed at the idea.

33 (1) ON: More than once did Elizabeth, in her ramble within the Park, unexpectedly meet Mr. Darcy. She felt all the perverseness of the mischance that should bring him where no one else was brought, and, to prevent its ever happening again, took care to inform him at first that it was a favourite haunt of hers...It seemed like wilful ill-nature, or a voluntary penance, for on these occasions it was not merely a few formal enquiries and an awkward pause and then away, but he actually thought it necessary to turn back and walk with her. He never said a great deal, nor did she give herself the trouble of talking or of listening much.

33 (36) "That is not an unnatural surmise," said Fitzwilliam, "but it is lessening the honour of my cousin's triumph very sadly."

33 (37) ON: This was spoken jestingly; but it appeared to [Elizabeth] so just a picture of Mr. Darcy, that she would not trust herself with an answer… That [Darcy] had been concerned in the measures taken to separate Mr. Bingley and Jane she had never doubted; but she had always attributed to Miss Bingley the principal design and arrangement of them. If his own vanity, however, did not mislead him, he was the cause, his pride and caprice were the cause of all that Jane had suffered, and still continued to suffer. He had ruined for a while every hope of happiness for the most affectionate, generous heart in the world; and no one could say how lasting an evil he might have inflicted.

33 (39) "To Jane herself," [Elizabeth] exclaimed, "there could be no possibility of objection…When she thought of her mother, indeed, her confidence gave way a little; but she would not allow that any objections there had material weight with Mr. Darcy, whose pride, she was convinced, would receive a deeper wound from the want of importance in his friend's connexions, than from their want of sense; and she was quite decided at last that he had been partly governed by this worst kind of pride, and partly by the wish of retaining Mr. Bingley for his sister.

34 (1) ON: When they were gone, Elizabeth, as if intending to exasperate herself as much as possible against Mr. Darcy, chose for her employment the examination of all the letters which Jane had written to her since her being in Kent…Mr. Darcy's shameful boast of what misery he had been able to inflict gave her a keener sense of her sister's sufferings. It was some consolation to think that his visit to Rosings was to end on the day after the next.

34 (3-30) – Darcy’s First Proposal

35 (3) ON: With no expectation of pleasure, but with the strongest curiosity, Elizabeth opened [Darcy’s] letter.

36 (1) ON: With amazement did [Elizabeth] first understand that [Darcy] believed any apology to be in his power; and stedfastly was she persuaded that he could have no explanation to give, which a just sense of shame would not conceal. With a strong prejudice against everything he might say, she began his account of what had happened at Netherfield…His belief of her sister's insensibility she instantly resolved to be false; and his account of the real, the worst objections to the match, made her too angry to have any wish of doing him justice. He expressed no regret for what he had done which satisfied her; his style was not penitent, but haughty. It was all pride and insolence.

36 (6) ON: Every lingering struggle in [Wickham’s] favour grew fainter and fainter; and in farther justification of Mr. Darcy, she could not but allow that Mr. Bingley, when questioned by Jane, had long ago asserted his blamelessness in the affair; that proud and repulsive as were his manners, she had never, in the whole course of their acquaintance -- an acquaintance which had latterly brought them much together, and given her a sort of intimacy with his ways -- seen anything that betrayed him to be unprincipled or unjust -- anything that spoke him of irreligious or immoral habits: that among his own connexions he was esteemed and valued -- that even Wickham had allowed him merit as a brother, and that she had often heard him speak so affectionately of his sister as to prove him capable of some amiable feeling; that had his actions been what Wickham represented them, so gross a violation of everything right could hardly have been concealed from the world; and that friendship between a person capable of it, and such an amiable man as Mr. Bingley, was incomprehensible.

36 (7) ON: [Elizabeth] grew absolutely ashamed of herself. Of neither Darcy nor Wickham could she think without feeling that she had been blind, partial, prejudiced, absurd.

36 (8) "How despicably have I acted!" [Elizabeth] cried; "I, who have prided myself on my discernment! I, who have valued myself on my abilities! who have often disdained the generous candour of my sister, and gratified my vanity in useless or blameable distrust. How humiliating is this discovery! yet, how just a humiliation! Had I been in love, I could not have been more wretchedly blind. But vanity, not love, has been my folly. Pleased with the preference of one, and offended by the neglect of the other, on the very beginning of our acquaintance, I have courted prepossession and ignorance, and driven reason away, where either were concerned. Till this moment I never knew myself."

37 (16) ON: Mr. Darcy's letter [Elizabeth] was in a fair way of soon knowing by heart. She studied every sentence; and her feelings towards its writer were at times widely different. When she remembered the style of his address, she was still full of indignation; but when she considered how unjustly she had condemned and upbraided him, her anger was turned against herself; and his disappointed feelings became the object of compassion. His attachment excited gratitude, his general character respect; but she could not approve him; nor could she for a moment repent her refusal, or feel the slightest inclination ever to see him again.

38 (17) ON: To know that she [Elizabeth] had the power of revealing what would so exceedingly astonish Jane [about Darcy’s proposal], and must, at the same time, so highly gratify whatever of her own vanity she had not yet been able to reason away, was such a temptation to openness as nothing could have conquered but the state of indecision in which she remained as to the extent of what she should communicate.

40 (4) "Indeed," replied Elizabeth [to Jane], "I am heartily sorry for [Darcy]; but he has other feelings, which will probably soon drive away his regard for me. You do not blame me, however, for refusing him?"

40 (10) Elizabeth to Jane: “There is but such a quantity of merit between [Wickham and Darcy]; just enough to make one good sort of man; and of late it has been shifting about pretty much. For my part, I am inclined to believe it all Mr. Darcy's; but you shall do as you chuse."

41 (10) ON: Such were the kind of lamentations resounding perpetually through Longbourn House [about (not) going to Brighton]. Elizabeth tried to be diverted by them; but all sense of pleasure was lost in shame. She felt anew the justice of Mr. Darcy's objections; and never had she before been so much disposed to pardon his interference in the views of his friend.

42 (8) ON: Elizabeth was excessively disappointed; she had set her heart on seeing the Lakes [not Derbyshire].

42 (9) ON: With the mention of Derbyshire there were many ideas connected. It was impossible for her to see the word without thinking of Pemberley and its owner. "But surely," said she, "I may enter his county with impunity, and rob it of a few petrified spars without his perceiving me."

42 (13) ON: Elizabeth was distressed [at the thought of visiting Pemberley]. She felt that she had no business at Pemberley, and was obliged to assume a disinclination for seeing it.

42 (15) ON: Elizabeth said no more -- but her mind could not acquiesce. The possibility of meeting Mr. Darcy, while viewing the place, instantly occurred. It would be dreadful! She blushed at the very idea, and thought it would be better to speak openly to her aunt than to run such a risk.

43 (1) ON: Elizabeth, as they drove along, watched for the first appearance of Pemberley Woods with some perturbation; and when at length they turned in at the lodge, her spirits were in a high flutter.

43 (3) ON: [Elizabeth] had never seen a place for which nature had done more, or where natural beauty had been so little counteracted by an awkward taste. They were all of them warm in their admiration; and at that moment she felt that to be mistress of Pemberley might be something!

43 (4) ON: While examining the nearer aspect of the house, all [Elizabeth’s] apprehensions of meeting its owner returned. She dreaded lest the chambermaid had been mistaken.

43 (5) ON: Elizabeth saw, with admiration of [Darcy’s] taste, that it was neither gaudy nor uselessly fine; with less of splendor, and more real elegance, than the furniture of Rosings.

43 (7) ON: [Remembering that she (Elizabeth) would not be allowed to invite the Gardiners to Pemberley] was a lucky recollection -- it saved her from something like regret.

43 (8) ON: [Elizabeth] longed to inquire of the housekeeper whether her master were really absent, but had not courage for it. At length, however, the question was asked by her uncle; and she turned away with alarm, while Mrs. Reynolds replied, that he was, adding, "But we expect him tomorrow, with a large party of friends." How rejoiced was Elizabeth that their own journey had not by any circumstance been delayed a day!

43 (28-45) – Mrs. Reynolds’ Description of Darcy

43 (48) ON: There was certainly at this moment, in Elizabeth's mind, a more gentle sensation towards the original [of the portrait] than she had ever felt in the height of their acquaintance. The commendation bestowed on him by Mrs. Reynolds was of no trifling nature. What praise is more valuable than the praise of an intelligent servant? As a brother, a landlord, a master, she considered how many people's happiness were in his guardianship! -- how much of pleasure or pain it was in his power to bestow! -- how much of good or evil must be done by him! Every idea that had been brought forward by the housekeeper was favourable to his character, and as she stood before the canvas, on which he was represented, and fixed his eyes upon herself, she thought of his regard with a deeper sentiment of gratitude than it had ever raised before; she remembered its warmth, and softened its impropriety of expression.

43 (51) ON: [Elizabeth’s and Darcy’s] eyes instantly met, and the cheeks of each were overspread with the deepest blush.

43 (52) ON: [Elizabeth] had instinctively turned away; but, stopping on his approach, received his compliments with an embarrassment impossible to be overcome…[The Gardiners] stood a little aloof while [Darcy] was talking to their niece, who, astonished and confused, scarcely dared lift her eyes to his face, and knew not what answer she returned to his civil enquiries after her family. Amazed at the alteration in his manner since they last parted, every sentence that he uttered was increasing her embarrassment; and every idea of the impropriety of her being found there recurring to her mind, the few minutes in which they continued together were some of the most uncomfortable of her life.

43 (54) ON: Elizabeth heard not a word, and, wholly engrossed by her own feelings, followed [the Gardiners] in silence. She was overpowered by shame and vexation. Her coming there was the most unfortunate, the most ill-judged thing in the world! How strange must it appear to him! In what a disgraceful light might it not strike so vain a man! It might seem as if she had purposely thrown herself in his way again! Oh! why did she come? or, why did he thus come a day before he was expected? Had they been only ten minutes sooner, they should have been beyond the reach of his discrimination; for it was plain that he was that moment arrived -- that moment alighted from his horse or his carriage. She blushed again and again over the perverseness of the meeting. And his behaviour, so strikingly altered -- what could it mean? That he should even speak to her was amazing! -- but to speak with such civility, to inquire after her family! Never in her life had she seen his manners so little dignified, never had he spoken with such gentleness as on this unexpected meeting. What a contrast did it offer to his last address in Rosings Park, when he put his letter into her hand! She knew not what to think, nor how to account for it.

43 (55) ON: [Elizabeth’s] thoughts were all fixed on that one spot of Pemberley House, whichever it might be, where Mr. Darcy then was. She longed to know what at that moment was passing in his mind -- in what manner he thought of her, and whether, in defiance of everything, she was still dear to him. Perhaps he had been civil only because he felt himself at ease; yet there had been that in his voice which was not like ease.

43 (57) ON: Whilst wandering on in this slow manner, they were again surprised, and Elizabeth's astonishment was quite equal to what it had been at first, by the sight of Mr. Darcy approaching them, and at no great distance. The walk being here less sheltered than on the other side, allowed them to see him before they met. Elizabeth, however astonished, was at least more prepared for an interview than before, and resolved to appear and to speak with calmness, if he really intended to meet them. For a few moments, indeed, she felt that he would probably strike into some other path. This idea lasted while a turning in the walk concealed him from their view; the turning past, he was immediately before them. With a glance, she saw, that he had lost none of his recent civility; and, to imitate his politeness, she began as they met to admire the beauty of the place; but she had not got beyond the words "delightful," and "charming," when some unlucky recollections obtruded, and she fancied that praise of Pemberley from her, might be mischievously construed. Her colour changed, and she said no more.

43 (58-75) – Introducing the Gardiners to Darcy, Darcy wanting Elizabeth to meet his sister, etc.

44 (1) ON: The perturbation of Elizabeth's feelings was every moment increasing [while waiting for Georgiana and Darcy to be shown in]. She was quite amazed at her own discomposure; but amongst other causes of disquiet, she dreaded lest the partiality of the brother should have said too much in her favour; and, more than commonly anxious to please, she naturally suspected that every power of pleasing would fail her.

44 (6) ON: Of the lady's sensations [the Gardiners] remained a little in doubt; but that the gentleman was overflowing with admiration was evident enough.

44 (10) ON: It was not often that [Elizabeth] could turn her eyes on Mr. Darcy himself; but, whenever she did catch a glimpse, she saw an expression of general complaisance, and in all that he said she heard an accent so far removed from hauteur or disdain of his companions, as convinced her that the improvement of manners which she had yesterday witnessed, however temporary its existence might prove, had at least outlived one day. When she saw him thus seeking the acquaintance and courting the good opinion of people with whom any intercourse a few months ago would have been a disgrace -- when she saw him thus civil, not only to herself, but to the very relations whom he had openly disdained, and recollected their last lively scene in Hunsford Parsonage -- the difference, the change was so great, and struck so forcibly on her mind, that she could hardly restrain her astonishment from being visible. Never, even in the company of his dear friends at Netherfield, or his dignified relations at Rosings, had she seen him so desirous to please, so free from self-consequence or unbending reserve, as now, when no importance could result from the success of his endeavours, and when even the acquaintance of those to whom his attentions were addressed would draw down the ridicule and censure of the ladies both of Netherfield and Rosings.

44 (16) ON: As for Elizabeth, her thoughts were at Pemberley this evening more than the last; and the evening, though as it passed it seemed long, was not long enough to determine her feelings towards one in that mansion; and she lay awake two whole hours endeavouring to make them out. She certainly did not hate him. No; hatred had vanished long ago, and she had almost as long been ashamed of ever feeling a dislike against him, that could be so called. The respect created by the conviction of his valuable qualities, though at first unwillingly admitted, had for some time ceased to be repugnant to her feelings; and it was now heightened into somewhat of a friendlier nature by the testimony so highly in his favour, and bringing forward his disposition in so amiable a light, which yesterday had produced. But above all, above respect and esteem, there was a motive within her of goodwill which could not be overlooked. It was gratitude -- gratitude, not merely for having once loved her, but for loving her still well enough to forgive all the petulance and acrimony of her manner in rejecting him, and all the unjust accusations accompanying her rejection. He who, she had been persuaded, would avoid her as his greatest enemy, seemed, on this accidental meeting, most eager to preserve the acquaintance, and without any indelicate display of regard, or any peculiarity of manner, where their two selves only were concerned, was soliciting the good opinion of her friends, and bent on making her known to his sister. Such a change in a man of so much pride, excited not only astonishment but gratitude -- for to love, ardent love, it must be attributed; and as such, its impression on her was of a sort to be encouraged, as by no means unpleasing, though it could not be exactly defined. She respected, she esteemed, she was grateful to him, she felt a real interest in his welfare; and she only wanted to know how far she wished that welfare to depend upon herself, and how far it would be for the happiness of both that she should employ the power, which her fancy told her she still possessed, of bringing on the renewal of his addresses.

44 (17) ON: They were, therefore, to go [to Pemberley the next day]. -- Elizabeth was pleased; though when she asked herself the reason, she had very little to say in reply.

45 (5) ON: [Elizabeth] expected every moment that some of the gentlemen would enter the room. She wished, she feared that the master of the house might be amongst them; and whether she wished or feared it most, she could scarcely determine.

46 (19) ON: Darcy made no answer [after hearing the news about Lydia]. He seemed scarcely to hear her, and was walking up and down the room in earnest meditation, his brow contracted, his air gloomy. Elizabeth soon observed, and instantly understood it. Her power was sinking; everything must sink under such a proof of family weakness, such an assurance of the deepest disgrace. She could neither wonder nor condemn, but the belief of his self-conquest brought nothing consolatory to her bosom, afforded no palliation of her distress. It was, on the contrary, exactly calculated to make her understand her own wishes; and never had she so honestly felt that she could have loved him, as now, when all love must be vain.

46 (23) ON: As [Darcy] quitted the room, Elizabeth felt how improbable it was that they should ever see each other again on such terms of cordiality as had marked their several meetings in Derbyshire; and as she threw a retrospective glance over the whole of their acquaintance, so full of contradictions and varieties, sighed at the perverseness of those feelings which would now have promoted its continuance, and would formerly have rejoiced in its termination.

46 (24) ON: If gratitude and esteem are good foundations of affection, Elizabeth's change of sentiment will be neither improbable nor faulty…Be that as it may, she saw [Darcy] go with regret; and in this early example of what Lydia's infamy must produce, found additional anguish as she reflected on that wretched business.

48 (16) ON: The present unhappy state of the family rendered any other excuse for the lowness of her spirits unnecessary; nothing, therefore, could be fairly conjectured from that, though Elizabeth, who was by this time tolerably well acquainted with her own feelings, was perfectly aware that, had she known nothing of Darcy, she could have borne the dread of Lydia's infamy somewhat better. It would have spared her, she thought, one sleepless night out of two.

50 (12) ON: There were few people on whose secrecy [Elizabeth] would have more confidently depended [than Darcy’s]; but, at the same time, there was no one whose knowledge of a sister's frailty would have mortified her so much -- not, however, from any fear of disadvantage from it individually to herself, for, at any rate, there seemed a gulf impassable between them.

50 (13) [Really in love at last, IMO! - Line] ON: The wish of procuring her regard, which [Elizabeth] had assured herself of [Darcy’s] feeling in Derbyshire, could not in rational expectation survive such a blow as this. She was humbled, she was grieved; she repented, though she hardly knew of what. She became jealous of his esteem, when she could no longer hope to be benefited by it. She wanted to hear of him, when there seemed the least chance of gaining intelligence. She was convinced that she could have been happy with him, when it was no longer likely they should meet.

50 (14) ON: What a triumph for [Darcy], as [Elizabeth] often thought, could he know that the proposals which she had proudly spurned only four months ago, would now have been gladly and gratefully received!

50 (15) ON: [Elizabeth] began now to comprehend that [Darcy] was exactly the man who, in disposition and talents, would most suit her. His understanding and temper, though unlike her own, would have answered all her wishes.

52 (17) ON: The contents of [Mrs. Gardiner’s] letter threw Elizabeth into a flutter of spirits, in which it was difficult to determine whether pleasure or pain bore the greatest share…Oh! how heartily did she grieve over every ungracious sensation she had ever encouraged, every saucy speech she had ever directed towards [Darcy]. For herself, she was humbled; but she was proud of him. Proud that in a cause of compassion and honour he had been able to get the better of himself. She read over her aunt's commendation of him again and again. It was hardly enough; but it pleased her. She was even sensible of some pleasure, though mixed with regret, on finding how steadfastly both she and her uncle had been persuaded that affection and confidence subsisted between Mr. Darcy and herself.

53 (35) ON: [Darcy] was the person to whom the whole family were indebted for the first of benefits, and whom [Elizabeth] regarded herself with an interest, if not quite so tender, at least as reasonable and just as what Jane felt for Bingley.

53 (42) ON: More thoughtfulness, and less anxiety to please than when they last met, were plainly expressed [in Darcy’s behaviour]. [Elizabeth] was disappointed, and angry with herself for being so.

53 (44) ON: [Elizabeth] was in no humour for conversation with any one but [Darcy] himself; and to him she had hardly courage to speak.

54 (14) ON: Anxious and uneasy, the period which passed in the drawing-room, before the gentlemen came, was wearisome and dull to a degree that almost made [Elizabeth] uncivil. She looked forward to their entrance as the point on which all her chance of pleasure for the evening must depend.

54 (18) ON: Darcy had walked away to another part of the room. [Elizabeth] followed him with her eyes, envied every one to whom he spoke, had scarcely patience enough to help anybody to coffee, and then was enraged against herself for being so silly!

54 (25) ON: [Elizabeth] now lost every expectation of pleasure. They were confined for the evening at different [card] tables, and she had nothing to hope, but that [Darcy’s] eyes were so often turned towards her side of the room, as to make him play as unsuccessfully as herself.

56 (46) Elizabeth to Lady Catherine: “The wife of Mr. Darcy must have such extraordinary sources of happiness necessarily attached to her situation, that she could, upon the whole, have no cause to repine."

57 (29) ON: [Elizabeth’s] father had most cruelly mortified her by what he said of Mr. Darcy's indifference; and she could do nothing but wonder at such a want of penetration, or fear that, perhaps, instead of his seeing too little, she might have fancied too much.

58 (8) ON: Elizabeth, feeling all the more than common awkwardness and anxiety of [Darcy’s] situation, now forced herself to speak; and immediately, though not very fluently, gave him to understand that her sentiments had undergone so material a change since the period to which he alluded, as to make her receive with gratitude and pleasure his present assurances.

58 (19) ON: [Elizabeth] explained what [Darcy’s letter’s] effect on her had been, and how gradually all her former prejudices had been removed.

58 (23) Elizabeth to Darcy: “The feelings of the person who wrote and the person who received [the letter] are now so widely different from what they were then, that every unpleasant circumstance attending it, ought to be forgotten.”

58 (26) Darcy to Elizabeth: “I believed you to be wishing, expecting my addresses."

58 (27) Elizabeth to Darcy: "My manners must have been in fault, but not intentionally, I assure you. I never meant to deceive you, but my spirits might often lead me wrong.”

59 (2) ON: Darcy was not of a disposition in which happiness overflows in mirth; and Elizabeth, agitated and confused, rather knew that she was happy, than felt herself to be so.

59 (16) Elizabeth, after Jane’s question about how long she has loved Darcy: "It has been coming on so gradually, that I hardly know when it began.”

59 (19) Elizabeth told [Jane] the motives of her secrecy. She had been unwilling to mention Bingley; and the unsettled state of her own feelings had made her equally avoid the name of his friend.

59 (34) "I do, I do like him," [Elizabeth] replied [to her father], with tears in her eyes; "I love him.”

59 (36) ON: Elizabeth, still more affected, was earnest and solemn in her reply; and at length, by repeated assurances that Mr. Darcy was really the object of her choice, by explaining the gradual change which her estimation of him had undergone…she did conquer her father’s incredulity.

60 (5) Elizabeth to Darcy: “You were disgusted with the women who were always speaking and looking and thinking for your approbation alone. I roused and interested you, because I was so unlike them.”

60 (21) Elizabeth’s letter to her aunt: “I am the happiest creature in the world. Perhaps other people have said so before, but not one with such justice. I am happier even than Jane: she only smiles, I laugh.”

61 (14) ON: [Elizabeth and Darcy] were both ever sensible of the warmest gratitude towards the [Gardiners] who, by bringing her into Derbyshire, had been the means of uniting them.






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