T H E

L O I T E R E R

A

PERIODICAL WORK

I N

TWO VOLUMES.

First published at Oxford in the Years
1789 and 1790.


VOL. I and II.


"Speak of us as we are."




PRINTED FOR THE AUTHOR;

And sold by Messrs. PRINCE and COOKE, OXFORD;
Messr. EGERTONS, Whitehall, LONDON; Messrs. PEARSON
And POLLASON, BIRMINGHAM; Mr. W. MEYLER, Grove,
BATH; AND Messrs. COWSLADE and SMART, READING.

M,DCC,XC








TO

The PRESIDENT

AND

FELLOWS

OF

ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE,

OXFORD,




THIS WORK IS RESPECTFULLY INSCRIBED,

BY THEIR OBLIGED,

HUMBLE SERVANT,

THE AUTHOR









CONTENTS

OF THE

FIRST VOLUME



No. 1 – Introduction, and Plan of the Work.

No. 2 – Little adherence to truth in common conversation. – Sketch of a new Newspaper.

No. 3 – The misfortunes of an Oxford Sportsman, in a letter from Christopher Cockney.

No. 4 – Art of spending time – Journal of a modern Oxford Man.

No. 5 – Anecdotes of the Doubtfuls, in a letter from one of the family.

No. 6 – Different opinions of the Public with respect to the Loiterer, and it's Authors.

No. 7 – Use and Advantages of studying History.

No. 8 – Disadvantages arising from misconduct at Oxford, in a letter from H. Homely.

No. 9 – Letter from Sophia Sentiment. – Determination of the Loiterer in regard to Tales, Novels, &c.

No. 10 – National difference of Character between the French and English – Plan proposed for improving each.

No. 11 – Diversion of Tuft-hunting described – Memoirs of a Tuft-Hunter in a letter from Luke Lickspittle.

No. 12 – Letters from Abraham Steady; Chimericus; D.B. and Tom Witty.

No. 13 – Use and Abuse of Reviews – a Visit from Eugenio who had suffered from their attacks.

No. 14 – The medicinal Virtues of Port–Wine recommended in a letter from Toby Philpot.

No. 15 – Heavy expenses of a modern University Education; in a letter from Chrysostom.

No. 16 – Letter from Philo Morpheus, advising the Loiterer to dream.

No. 17 – Modern times vindicated from the charge of Degeneracy.

No. 18 – Propriety of perpetual Fellowships considered – Letters from Dismal Sour Crout, and Jeremiah Dozeaway.

No. 19 – Variety of meanings annexed to the same word, – Explanation of the term Dash.

No. 20 – Study of Heraldry vindicated, in a letter from Edmund Escutcheon.

No. 21 – Hints to Young Clergymen respecting their behaviour at a country Curacy.

No. 22 – Observations on several curious Advertisements in the Newspapers.

No. 23 – Vexations attending the pursuit, and possession of wealth, in a letter from Indicus.

No. 24 – Contempt of Trade Absurd, and illiberal.

No. 25 – Omai's description of British manners, and customs.

No. 26 – Pleasure of Elegant Society. – Some Errors in Conversation pointed out.

No. 27 – Thoughts on Education – A new system recommended.

No. 28 – Complain of a Wig. – Letter from Amicus.

No. 29 – Absurdity of marrying from Affection.

No. 30 – Characters of Dr. Villars, and Mr. Sensitive.



END of the FIRST VOLUME.








CONTENTS

OF THE

SECOND VOLUME



No. 31 – Pleasures of a Complainer, in a letter from Richard Rueful.

No. 32 – Peculiar danger of Rusticus from the attacks of a female Cousin.

No. 33Affectation the fault of modern manners – Some particular sorts of it marked out.

No. 34 – Loiterer in Town. Visit to Dick Distich.

No. 35 – Explanation of the fashionable transparent Tête.

No. 36 – Paper by the Publisher, explaining his distress in having received no Communication from the Author. – Letter from Mary Simple.

No. 37 – Journey from London in company with Sensitive.

No. 38 – Good effects of an attachment to family, exemplified in the history of Agrestis.

No. 39 – The history of Agrestis concluded.

No. 40 – Danger of an early retirement from the world, in a letter from C. M.

No. 41 – Early prejudices not useless. – Memoirs of an Highland Chieftain.

No. 42Bob Whirligig's pursuit of the Loiterer, and it's consequences.

No. 43 – Loiterer in danger – Letters from Benjamin Bluster and Margaret Mitten.

No. 44 – Schemes of Matrimonial happiness, and their effects.

No. 45 – An account of the Patent Air-machine – a new use for it discovered.

No. 46 – Danger of entertaining an ill opinion of mankind, in a letter from Leontine.

No. 47 – The indulgence of romantic ideas blamed. – History of Aurelius.

No. 48 – History of Aurelius concluded.

No. 49 – Different descriptions which travelers give of the same places, endeavoured to be accounted for.

No. 50 – Difficulty of raising Money for charitable purposes.

No. 51 – The Science of Physiognomy not to be depended on.

No. 52 – Ill effects of mercenary marriages exemplified in the history of Cecilia.

No. 53 – History of Cecilia concluded.

No. 54 – Mischief arising to a Country Gentleman's family from a Winter spent in Town, in a letter.

No. 55 – The same subject pursued in a Dream.

No. 56 – Propriety, and advantages of Gaming.

No. 57 – The danger of a girl who marries a man for whom she has no affection, in a letter from Clarissa M.

No. 58 – Strictures on the manners of modern Oxford-Men, in a conversation with Dr. Villars and Sensitive – Some idea of a College Tutor.

No. 59 – Rules for Prose Composition.

No. 60 – Some account of this work and it's Authors – Conclusion.


END of the SECOND VOLUME.







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